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states why he thinks -- why his country thinks the u.n.'s possibly interaction is a bad idea. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's hard words in the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound dug-in on capitol hill. >> all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap. it ne
was in new york. he was in america for the u.n. general assembly in september and i think wanted to come down and meet the president. and wasn't invited or that didn't happen. and then, you recall when the -- when that film that scurrilous film was made and attacks on the embassy in cairo and he was not quick to condemn the attacks and president obama let him know that the alliance was actually in question over that. but they seem to have gotten along very well over the efforts to combined effort to end the gaza conflict and we're on the phone a lot and both sides say, you know, achieved some sort of rappaport. >> thank you very much. >>> and just in, we're getting word the army private accused of leaking secrets to wick leaks is right now on the stand testifying in his defense. that's next. in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next gr
the u.s. passed 22 years ago. but 38 u. rep u.n. treaty leaving it five votes short of ratification. not even a rare visit by former republican senator bob dole who just before the vote made a difference. he's 89, appeared frail this his wheelchair and disabled from war injuries, came to the chamber to show support for this treaty. rick santorum led the charge against the treaty. he and some other republicans warned it would jeopardize u.s. sovereignty and personal freedoms. listen. >> the problem is, there's a provision in this international law which we would be adopting if the senate ratifies this that puts the state, the state in the position of determining what i in the best interest of a disabled child. >> i simply cannot support a tr that threatens the right of parents to raise their children with the constant looming threat of state interference. >> the treaty could be used to interfere with the ability of parents with disabled children to decide what action is in the best interest of their children. >> that all sounds very alarming. keeping them honest, it's not true. the t
? election coming up? what happened in the u.n.? what's the feeling there? >> well, certainly the israelis have made no secret of the fact that this is a direct punitive measure for what happened at the u.n. last thursday where, of course, the palestinians managed get an upgraded status there in the u.n. general assembly going to nonmember observer state. of course, the word state there is the operative one for the palestinians. the palestinians now say they do, in fact, have a state which is a taertory that is defined as the west bank, gaza, and east jerusalem. so, therefore, the palestinians are saying that this obviously would make the implementation of this state all but impossible because they say it would be impossible for them to even reach their capital that they want to have, which is, of course, east jerusalem. this is certainly a measure that's cause aing lot of international controversy. you were saying that great britain and france have already put out staunch statements aimed at the israelis. the israelis are saying, yes, all these countries have voiced their concern. they're
-to-face negotiations will lead to a lasting peace. meantime just after the u.n. vote, israel approved construction of new housing in the west bank in ears jerusalem. palestinian leaders said that would not return to the peace talks unless and until israel freezes that construction and it doesn't appear it's happening. they also say they want to return to the pre1967 borders whereby israel would give back the west bank east jerusalem and gaza. back to the early days of the internet. nobody knew how big it would become. obviously. and that's why representatives from around the world are getting together to rewrite the rules for the internet. this is fascinating and what they have in mind could change everything we know about the internet. we have in-depth report coming. plus, after losing the latino vote in a big way in the 2012 election. republicans are now pushing for new immigration plan in congress. it is not going over well with everybody as you might imagine. that's next. you know how painful heartburn can be. for fast, long lasting relief, use doctor recommended gaviscon®. only gaviscon® fo
been contaminated. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water for both washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have dropped from 10% of cases early on to about 1%. still, 600 people have died from cholera this year. many in remote areas even those unaffected by floods. there's now plenty of awareness of cholera in haiti. the biggest challenge for people today is distance. as the epidemic subsided over the last few months many treatment centers have been closed in the remote areas. getting to plays that remain open is a huge challenge that can take hours. and that delay can be fatal. this man, a 27-year-old mother of three, will lik
doesn't pick u.n. ambassador susan rice. >>> elsewhere, president obama has drawn a hard line on tax increases for the wealthiest of americans. rejecting an offer that republicans claim is as good as it's going to get. tracie potts joins us with the latest on this. good morning. >> reporter: right now it's looking more likely that we could, could, go over that fiscal cliff at the end of the month because right now, negotiations here are at a stand still. president obama talks to the business round table today after telling bloomberg he absolutely won't bunch. the wealthiest americans must pay more. >> we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> reporter: he may be in a good position to wait it out. a new poll found more half of americans will blame republicans if we go over the fiscal cliff. >> republicans do not want to touch one hair on the head of one person making over $250,000. that is the rub. >> they've got to come with some specific revenue. they refuse to do that. >> reporter: even other republicans are split on john boehner's plan to avoid tax hikes all together
, the foreign policy team. >> we saw this joking moment, let me replay it, a news conference to push the u.n. treaty on disabilities which -- >> which is going to -- may fail. >> which is unbelievable since america has been -- >> very surprising. >> way out front since the days of bush '41 and tom harken was the big -- >> bob dole. >> and john mccain today made a plea for bob dole who is in walter reed he wants to see this great moment, a worldwide standard, it would be good for business, but as you pointed out on the daily rundown today, the chamber of commerce supports this, selling wheelchairs -- >> around the world. >> and here, it's stalemate. it needs two-thirds, more than 60. this is a treaty. because it has u.n. attached to it -- >> going to say it's brand, it's about brand. >> at that moment with mccain and john kerry because of foreign relations issue and this is the way mccain sort of gigged john kerry and kerry teased him back. >> thank you very much, mr. secretary. >> thank you very much, mr. president. >> and there was a lot of joking after that. a lot of laughing. >> we should
of the u.n. environment program and we asked him if anything at all could come out of this conference. >> we still have to give you a days ago, and i believe there will be a number of outcomes. the green climate fund, the kyoto protocol extension -- these are fundamental building blocks of an international climate process, but ever since copenhagen, we are pursuing a search for a new framework for global climate cooperation, and doha in itself will not deliver that. we should also recognize that these conferences have not provided us with a single framework, but they have triggered all across the world immense initiatives in the direction of a low-carbon economy, and i think these are also a byproduct of this process, and we need to recognize them because they are part of building our ability to move towards a low-carbon future. nevertheless, doha should at a minimum enable us to keep the process moving forward. in itself, it has not delivered a breakthrough. that is clear. >> that was the head of the united nations' environment program. now we had a championship talk -- soccer, and l
as quote, counterproductive to peace efforts. the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, warned that little will change in the palestinian territories after this vote. palestinians in gaza and the west bank flooded into the streets late into the night. they are shooting fireworks, waving flags, honking car horns in celebration. let's go live to cnn's fred pleitgen in ramallah with the latest. very big day for the palestinians. what are you seeing now? >> reporter: hi, wolf. well, the celebrations certainly have quieted down somewhat but it was really just in the past ten minutes that they did quiet down. before that, what happened was that these massive celebrations that you saw here on arafat square with people shooting fireworks, ak-47s and pistols into the air, then went into the side streets where people drove around in their cars, honking horns and certainly were very happy with the way that vote in the united nations general assembly went. to them, they say they believe it's actually very significant to the palestinians. they say they believe it could be a first step to fu
assembly is the the wrong place. >> before being secretary of state, you were the ambassador to the u.n. and you've raised this issue in the past. is the u.n. losing its efficacy, is there a better way going forward to address some of these key issues? >> well, i believe in the u.n. and the security council and what has been interesting is the number of resolutions that have been taken, but ultimately what needs to happen is cooperation i think with a regional organization and one looks at what the tools are for doing something. so nato is a very important part they are in all these activities. so from their vantage point of a professor at this time, i think it is interesting to kind of look at what the tools that are available. but the united nations is the voice of the international community. what is really disappointing is the role that the russians are not playing. by taking a stand that is not helpful in terms of supporting the international community. >> would you extend that to their stance with regard to iran? >> well, i think that the iran situation is different. what is inter
failed to pass a u.n. disability treaty by just five votes. combat veterans like senators john mccain and john kerry delivered impassioned speeches, but dissenting voters said the treaty could pose a threat to national sovereignty. this is a stretch. more than 150 countries have signed the treaty designed to create unilateral rights for people with disabilities. it's actually based on america's ada act which bob dole helped pass more than 20 years ago. and you know, andrea, watching this american hero on the floor, a guy who is disabled, left part of himself, as he has said and others have said, on the battlefields of western europe, coming in and making a plea. i'm really surprised that this was killed by fringe concerns, fringe, fringe concerns. >> and it was, in fact, his fellow senators, several of the people who served with bob dole, who were the key votes here. and john kerry was leading it on the floor with john mccain. it was one of those bipartisan coalitions of veterans, wounded veterans, mccain and others, and the wounded warriors. the chamber of commerce. this is basic
for u.n. affairs at the national security counsel at the time of the genocide. the rwanda genocide. now, that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time, it was a working level staff position. her first in government. ambassador rice could make announcements, but wouldn't be involved in making such an important decision about getting involved militarily in rwanda and president clinton said he made the decision. it was the greatest mistake of his presidency. and susan rice traveled to rwanda shortly after the genocide and said seeing the horrors of rwanda, the ground littered with hundreds of thousands of bodies is what actually made her passionate about the issue of preventing genocide in the future. she realized this was a wrong decision of the administration. she returned when she became u.n. ambassador, spoke about that experience and there's also a quote from her in the book reference by rabbi shmuley in which she swore that if she ever faced a crisis like that again, she would argue for dramatic
. the senate has managed to vote on something, rejected a u.n. treaty to extend rights to the blind and disabled, rights that have been the law of the land here in the united states since 1990. despite an emotional appearance from bob dole just out of walter reed, 89 years old, a passionate advocate for equal rights for the disabled since his first speech on the senate floor in 1969. joining me for our daily fix, kra, managing editor of post politics.com and capitol hill correspondents, nbc's kelly o'donnell and luke russert. kelly, to you, because this vote in the senate, john kerry led the way, it was bipartisan, in support. they needed 6 votes. it's a treaty, two-thirds of the senate and it failed. talk to me about all the ramifications here. >> it's not that often andrea, you know this, when votes on the senate floor can draw such powerful emotions and even tears from members of the gallery who attend in the public seats that are not in camera view. but we had that today. there was strong, passionate feelings about this for those in support of the treaty, which essentially as th
kerry is firing back at senator rick santorum. it's all about this. opposition to a u.n. treaty. one that a lot of people thought was a no-brainer. it was about the rights of the disabled all over the world. we brought you this story yesterday. senate republicans rejecting this treaty on tuesday despite the fact that one of their own, bob dole, bob dole, a former majority leader, came to the floor in a wheelchair trying to draw support for this treaty. he was being pushed by his wife and made an impassioned plea. senator santorum explained opposition to this treaty in a piece published in "the daily beast." in part he says this. our nation has been been the worldwide leader when it comes to protecting the disabled. we should be telling the u.n. and not the other way around how to ensure dignity and respect for the disabled. effectively saying nobody tells the united states what to do. it sets a very dangerous precedent perhaps for other things. okay. that sounded legitimate until it came out that that's not what the treaty suggests. senator kerry was mincing absolutely no words in sa
as constituting eligibility for u.n. membership. it does not. this resolution does not establish that palestine is a state. the united states believes the current resolution should not and cannot be read as establishing terms of reference. in many respects, the resolution prejudges the issues is says are to be resolved through negotiation, particularly with respect to its territory. at the same time, it ignores other questions such as security, which must be solved for any final agreement to be achieved. -- viable agreement to be achieved. president obama has outlined a realistic basis for negotiations to continue. we will based our efforts on that approach. the recent conflict in gaza is the latest reminder that the absence of peace risks the presence of war. we urged those who share our hopes for peace between a sovereign palestine into a secure israel to join us in supporting negotiations, not as encouraging further distractions. there are no shortcuts. long after the votes have been cast, long after the speeches have been forgotten, it is the palestinians and the israelis who must still tal
or russia. u.n. secretary general was asked about the asylum question today he did not seem to favor the idea. listen. >> the united nations must not allow any impunity whoever commits gross violation of human rights must be held accountable and should be brought to justice. >> that sentiment was echoed by officials at the u.s. state department who said there has to be, quote: accountability. the counter argument to that is that perhaps anything that gets assad out of syria and stops the slaughter of civilians might be worth thinking about, harris. >> some people may be wondering what happens if in fact assad does go. we still haven't seen united opposition of all those rebels to replace him. >> we certainly have not seen anything like a united opposition. the rebels say that he they are seeking more of a unified political leadership but it is hard to come by because there are so many groups involved in pposition movement from secular democrats who began this simply as a way to gain more democracy in syria to hard line islamist and even al qaeda groups. one of those hard line groups
of the dictator kim jung un. >> this is against the u.n. security council resolutions and we are monitoring the situation closely. and working very closely with the self-defense force and the ministry of defense. this is a dangerous situation. and we do not support those actions right now by north korea. bill: steven yates, sir, good morning and welcome back here to america's newsroom. it's been some time since we talked about this issue. now it's back and on the plate. >> any time you are dealing with long range missile capability it will be a concern. we have thousands of troops stationed in japan and korea. there is talk of being able to reach los angeles or the western coast. no north korean test so far has reached that near abroad. bill: what would korea want to prove with this launch? >> always dangerous to try to climb into the mind of a north korean leader. but there would have to be a domestic component to the situation. there are important elections taking place in japan on the 16th and south korea on the 19th of this month. well within the range of this test that is scheduled to
about the susan rice situation. earlier this week he said he thinks the u.n. ambassador is doing a great job. are you kidding me he? dr. rice mislead the entire world about the libyan murders. still won't explain how that happened. and that's a great job? very possible that president obama will nominate susan rice for the secretary of state position that hillary clinton is vacating that would obviously be another in-your-face to the republicans. it doesn't seem that mr. obama wants to run the country efficiently. i guess i could be wrong, maybe he will compromise in the end. but now we have a my way or the highway situation. the problem with the president is the highway passes through the republic majority house of representatives. these people aren't going to okay more than a trillion dollars in tax hikes with no spending cuts or entitlement reform. it's not going to happen. and mr. obama knows it's not going to happen. so why are we playing this foolish game? the american people deserve better than this. we have huge financial problems in this country. problems that every single one of
for the palestinians at the u.n. says it is not looking for way, is now looking for ways to put pressure on israel but it is not at this time considering trade sanctions. as for the palestinians, and this is very interesting, a member of the p.l.o. raised the possibility today that the p.l.o. would consider taking matters, now, to the international criminal court but many sources believe that it is highly unlikely that the palestinian president is given assurances to the united states that will not happen at least in the foreseeable future, but, definitely the palestinians not happy. they are pleased it appears that the world consensus is lining up behind them. >>shepard: thank you from jerusalem. there is a frantic search at home for a sick little girl that doctors say could die if they don't find her very soon. this is surveillance video from a hospital in phoenix. police say that is the 11-year-old cancer patient's mother sneaking her right out of the hospital with potentially deadly piece of equipment localed in her heart. a nurse spotted them leaving and called the police. >> they were actual
don't think 100%, soledad. susan rice was director for u.n. affairs at the national security council at the time of the again side, the rwanda again side. that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time it was a working level staff position. her first in government, ambassador rice could make announcements at that level, but wouldn't be involved making an important decision getting involved militarily in rwanda. president clinton said he made the decision, it was the greatest mistake of his presidency, and ambassador rice travelled to rwanda after the again side. she said seeing the ground littered with hundreds of thousands of bodies is what made her passionate about the issue of preventing again side in the future. she realized this was a wrong decision of the administration. she spoke about that experience. and there's also a quote from her in this book reference, in which she swore if she ever faced a crisis for that again, she would argue for dramatic action and go down in flames. >> so then
point of negotiations, the appearance was that the u.n. secretary general, the u.s. secretary of state, the president of egypt and a few more foreign ministers all came in a way to save hamas and the islamic jihad. now, this is rather strange that two terrorist organizations which are involved almost endlessly in killing innocent people which are exercising the most authoritarian regime in gaza are protected by these countries. but that was the result of the way in which the whole thing was handled and i'm not sure that is helpful toward the future. >> rose: let me go back in the past. what exactly did you and mr. abbas negotiate and why did it not hold? >> well, that's a good question. first of all, it didn't hold because at the very end when we were a very, very, very close to conclude an agreement between israel and the palestinians which have -- would have resolve it had historical conflict between the two sides and would have created two states, palestinian state, you recognize boundaries and, of course, the state of israel is the home of the jewish people. in recognized bound rei
? condemnation from israel and the u.s., as the u.n. general assembly now votes to recognize a palestinian state. is this the right tack for peace? >> fortune and glory. one of the winners of the record powerball jackpot is out. and the other may not be a mystery any more. >> hmm. plus battered but not broken. an exclusive look here at lady liberty after superstorm sandy. >> we have a packed show ahead. steny hoyer, harvard economics pro-presser ken rogoff. russell simmons, former presidential candidate jon huntsman and good samaritan larry deprimo. >> gave the boots to the homeless man. we're going to get the whole back story there. it is friday, november 30th. tgif. to you and you as well. "starting point" begins right now. >>> your elected officials trading insults, playing the blame game here as the clock is winding down on the fiscal cliff. keep in mind time is a-wasting. in 32 days now tax rates soar, spending gets slashed. oh, and don't forget, congress, yeah, they get to take a break for the holidays in 14 days. a recipe for recession. the president is pitching a plan that calls for $1.6
neighbor to the north, being turkey. security concerns are prompting the u.n. to announce it is pulling nonessential personnel out of syria. want to bring in fran townsend, our cnn national security contributor and member of the cia external advisory committee. and, fran, good to see you. let's talk about these chemical weapons because we know that in the past, what, three, three have been, i guess, two, two different times the u.s. has seen syria move its chemical weapons around. but intelligence suggests this time the movement is different. how so? >> well, there was an american official speaking on background, obviously, to a new york times reporter who didn't describe this as movement of the chemical weapons. what makes it different this time was it was described as the syrians taking steps in preparation for use. that's far more serious and far more concerning to american and regional officials if syria is undertaking activity that looks like the preparation for the deployment of these chemical weapons. remember, you mentioned, brooke, turkey. also jordan. we have -- there are regi
brash, but he was of u.n. ambassador -- again, query whether that was a good match -- and she would be u.k. ambassador, but they say she doesn't want the job. she's happily installed over at voc and i hear -- can at vogue, and i hear working on a piece on you. >> me? i'll be on jon stewart with this, guaranteed. [laughter] megyn: thanks for being here, stu. we're taking your thoughts on that, follow me on twitter @megyn kelly, let me know what you think about ambassador win tour. >>> what started as a routine traffic stop ended as anything but as police made a dramatic discovery in the trunk of this car. that okays next. >>> plus, an estimated 75,000 soldiers to capture syria's chemical weapons supply. just ahead, why that is a growing concern as we get reports the syrians are mixing up batches of nerve agents right now. megyn: well, what started as a routine traffic stop ended as anything but after police in kentucky discovered what looked like an attempted kidnapping. trace gallagher live in l.a. with the details. trace? >> reporter: sean loamer says he was just closing up where he wor
five special sessions of the u.n. human rights council in geneva. they come up with strong resolutions that what is happening in syria are crimes against humanity. they establish an inquiry to investigate these crimes. the convince the security council to bring the crimes to the international criminal court. none of this happens. this is why the credibility of the international justice system, which supports the international criminal court, as a guardian of the international justice system -- it is at stake. this is why the swiss government -- they come up with an initiative which, until now, 40 countries signed this initiative. they called many members in africa, in europe, in the international community, to support and to call to arms the security council, to refer that crimes happened to the international criminal court. the second issue -- the necessary support to the situation on the ground, according to the syrians. as i said before, the gap from the international community and what is going on the ground -- we have to reconcile the and the syrians -- they do not call for humani
. without having to go through congress were without having to get ratification of the u.n. treaty. megyn: it is another system. it looks kind of like cap-and-trade from what i'm reading. where have you, and west virginia, if you want to have a certain number of coal power plants come you have to trade -- there can only be one toll number of omissions and the states have to work it out amongst themselves. >> that is unlikely to go into effect. it would be too hard to pull that out. that is what this group is talking about. the epa really doesn't need to worry about that. they can just crack down on industry on their own. congressman stutzman, and there are enough democrats bases that may join with republicans to push back the epa. in all likelihood, the president found the sweet spot where he can go out there and his team can go out there and really crack down on carbon emissions and deal with global warming, but do it in a way that doesn't require approval. megyn: what happens if you violate the new epa standards? reporter: the people that run the plants will be fined into oblivion. it w
made it very clear at the u.n. general assembly where the israeli red line is. but there is an argument that there is no american red line, there is an american invisible line, and no one is sure where it is. not the iranians, not us, not the israelis. do you share that concern? is there anything we can do to establish a more conclusive and defined redline so that it helps us in our negotiating strategy with the iranians? as we were reminded this morning, persians negotiate in the bazaar. do we have an america that we can more clearly defined -- american red line that we can more clearly define? >> there are a couple of reasons by the military threat is important. as sandy indicated, the iranians to respond to credible threats of force. -- do respond to credible threats of force. if you read the biographies of the hostage-takers, they said they were afraid ronald reagan was going to act like a cowboy. the release the hostages the minute he was sworn in. the soviets threatened to bomb tehran, and the hostages were let go. it is important to note that the iran-iraq war came to win and win
to be on the u.n. security council. going there and making a personal investment has a real strategic purpose. the same goes for all the tiny pacific islands. look at the future of asia, look at the voting dynamics in key international institutions, you start to understand the value of paying attention to these places. let me add that in recent months we have been reminded once again -- by its very nature, american diplomacy must be practiced in dangerous places. the men and women who serve our country overseas represent the best traditions of a bald and generous nation. they are no stranger to danger, from tehran and beirut to east africa and saudi arabia, and now in benghazi and so many other places in between. we have seen diplomats and development experts devoted to peace who are targeted by terrorists devoted to death. that is why we are taking immediate steps to bolster security and readiness at our missions across the globe. we have already dispatched joint teams from the departments of state and defense to review high brett posts to determine if there are improvements we need in light
, moscow's support in places like the u.n. security council, the iranians are very worried about upsetting russia's interests in the south caucuses. this is best reflected by iran's position in regards to armenia and georgia where russian interests are strongest. i have provided more detail in my testimony and provided some examples. second, i think we have a failure in tehran's so-called big brother approach which i think is heavily tainted with an ideological syndrome. so i would quickly say it's not just that iran doesn't want to be active in the south caucuses because it fears that the russians might be upset, but it's also because of a failure of its model as a political invitation that is extended over the last 20 years to these three countries, particularly azerbaijan. where russian interests are least sensitive n my view, iran has also failed to gain traction. this is thanks to -- excuse me. where iran has basically insisted on sharing its anti-american and aunt-western portions, and this is a call which the authorities in azerbaijan have repeatedly rejected, i think they would hav
voted because they, quote, hate the u.n. >>> tragic ending to a month's long search for two missing cousins. coming up next, the news here today on these iowa girls last seen in july when they left for a bike ride. [ man ] in hong kong, on my way to the board meeting... anne's tablet called my phone. anne's tablet was chatting with a tablet in sydney... a desktop in zurich... and a telepresence room in brazil. the secure cloud helped us get some numbers from my assistant's pc in new york. and before i reached the top, the board meeting became a congrats we sold the company party. wait til my wife's phone hears about this. [ cellphone vibrating ] [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center, working together has never worked so well. >>> the families of two missing iowa girls preparing for the worst right now. hunters found two bodies in a wooded area just yesterday afternoon. near the area where 10-year-old lyric cook and 8-year-old cousin elizabeth collins last seen in july. >> i can tell you that we do have two bodies that had been found. right now, it's looking that the outcome
, the u.n. i understand the frustrations of the israelis and the presen situation. but the fact is, when all of that frustration is done, you have to get back to the reality. and the reality is there is only one way of stabilizing the situation and that is getting back to a credible negotiation with a frame work shaping it that allows us to negotiate a two-state solution. i still believe despite people saying there's no way it can happen, it's the only answer. >> is there any hope in the immediate future, those talks, direct face-to-face negotiations between the israelis and palestinians will get off the ground? >> it's possible. we've discussed this many times, wolf. most of the time we've been talking about the latest impact. but president obama has been re-elected here in the u.s. i know he feels deeply about this issue. he regards peace between israelis and palestinians as a genuine strategic interest of the united states. and we're going to have i think a fresh opportunity to go back to this issue to try and grip it and frame it in the right way and we've got to try. i always say to
to the united nations where palestinian leaders will be bidding for a u.n. recognition of state could. the resolution would live to the palestinian authority you an observer status from entity to non-member state, like the vatican, and is expected to pass the 193-nation general assembly. at least 50 european states plan to vote for it. israel and the united states are strongly opposed because it would conflict with the peace deal. streaming live here on c-span. >> sri lanka, chile, somalia, china, iraq, grenada, guyana, the palestine, venezuela, vietnam, catarrh, khazikstan, cuba, kuwait, kenya, 11 non, libya, molly, malaysia, madagascar, egypt, morocco, saudi arabia, mauritania, namibia, nigeria, nicaragua, india, yemen, qaeda stan, .elarus mr. president, this important draft resolution is aimed at taking a historic decision, granting palestine the status of non-member observer state. the preamble of the drafted resolution refers to the unacceptability of territory by force stipulated in the charter. the other paragraph in the preamble reaffirms the right of the palestinian people to
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